Print on Demand Maps

Reference, 1998 to 2017

Amérique du Nord – Carte Murale – L’Atlas du Canada

La série de cartes de référence de 1961 à 2010 de l’Atlas du Canada contient la version la plus récente d’une carte mise à jour régulièrement et qui provient de la série de cartes de base de l’Atlas national du Canada. Chaque version présente l’Amérique du Nord à une échelle de 1/10 000 000. La carte de référence générale couvre en détail les lieux habités, les voies de transport et le réseau hydrographique. Les terres émergées sont colorées afin de représenter chaque pays et ses dépendances, tandis que les zones extracôtières le sont afin de montrer la bathymétrie. La carte possède deux cartons : le premier montre Hawaii, également à l’échelle de 1/10 000 000, et le second est un carton de l’Amérique du Nord à l’échelle de 1/53 000 000 montrant le relief et indiquant l’altitude des montagnes importantes. En outre, la carte comporte un tableau des distances entre les grandes villes.

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Canada Wall Map (2009) – Bilingual – Atlas of Canada

This bilingual colourful edition of the Canada map published in 2009 is the largest of the Atlas of Canada wall maps. Relief shading highlights the physiography of the country and the map’s projection provides a three-dimensional view of Canada.

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Canada Wall Map – Bilingual – Atlas of Canada

This bilingual map is the latest publication in the Atlas of Canada Reference Map Series. It is an update to the 1:6 000 000 paper map of Canada published in 2006. The map uses a vertical near-side perspective projection, which provides a unique three-dimensional view of Canada. Most data are current to the period 2010 to 2013.

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Le monde – Carte Murale – L’Atlas du Canada

La série de cartes de référence de 1961 à 2010 de l’Atlas du Canada contient la plus récente version d’une carte mise à jour régulièrement et provenant de la série de cartes de base de l’Atlas national du Canada. Chaque version présente le monde à une échelle équatoriale de 1/35 000 000. Cette carte de référence générale indique le nom et le statut de tous les pays souverains et dépendants, ainsi que les grandes villes. La version de 2005 comporte deux nouveaux ajouts : le relief des terres émergées est représenté par ombres portées, et toutes les étendues marines sont illustrées par des isobathes et des teintes bathymétriques.

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North America Wall Map Wall Map – Atlas of Canada

This map shows North America at a scale of 1: 10 000 000. The map is a general reference map giving detailed coverage of populated places, transportation routes and the drainage network. Land areas are coloured to represent individual countries and dependencies. The map sheet has three inset maps showing the Aleutian Islands (Alaska), Hawaii and the North America relief with significant mountain elevations. There is also a table of road mileages between major cities.

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North Circumpolar Region Wall Map – Bilingual – Atlas of Canada

This bilingual map shows the geography of the northern circumpolar region, north of approximately 55 degrees, at a scale of 1:9 000 000. The map uses the azimuthal equidistant projection. It includes all international boundaries, as well as the Canadian provincial and territorial boundaries and Canada’s 200 nautical mile offshore exclusive economic zone. National capital cities are shown, as are other cities, towns, villages and hamlets. Some seasonally populated places are also included. The map displays a number of significant northern features, including the median sea ice extent for September 1981 to 2010, the tree line, undersea relief, land relief, the Magnetic North Pole, glaciers, ice fields and coastal ice shelves. Many of the physiographic and hydrographic features are labelled.

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Northern Canada Wall Map – Bilingual – Atlas of Canada

This is a bilingual map. The vast Canadian geography north of approximately 50° latitude is depicted on the map Northern Canada / Nord du Canada. The 1:4 000 000 scale provides a detailed regional base of the north. The map shows the three territories, the northern areas of the provinces, and adjacent areas of Russia, Alaska, and Greenland. The surveyed locations of the Magnetic North Pole are mapped from 1831 to 2011. An inset of the Labrador coast shows the cultural connection of Nunatsiavut to the Inuit of Nunavut.

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Relief Map of Canada Wall Map – Atlas of Canada

This map uses the Vertical Near-Side Perspective Projection. The map’s main feature is showing Canada with very-detailed digital shaded relief. All official Canadian, provincial, and surrounding international boundaries are shown, including the proposed boundary for the new territory of Nunavut (which came into existence in 1999). There are three small maps of Canada shown on this map sheet, all at scale 1:35 000 000. One shows the major physiographic regions; the second shows major drainage basins, and the third map shows classes of vegetation cover. All data on the map is current to the mid to late 1990’s.

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The World Wall Map – Atlas of Canada

This map shows the World at an equatorial scale of 1: 35 000 000. The map is a general reference sheet focusing on showing the name and status of all sovereign countries and dependencies, and showing major cities. The 2005 version has two new additions: one is showing shaded relief for land areas, the other is showing bathymetric contours and colours for all marine areas.

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Posters, 1994 to 2009

2010 Olympic sites / Sites olympiques 2010

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a large-format Olympics Sites wall map (42 inches by 45 inches) featuring a 1:250 000 scale topographic base map extending from the southern tip of Vancouver Island north to Pemberton and east to Abbotsford, British Columbia. It contains inset maps, at 1:50 000 scale of Vancouver and Whistler, from the new CanTopo map series to show these areas in greater detail. Additional thematic information has been added to these insets to highlight the location of the Olympics and Paralympics sites (for example ski runs, athletes’ village, hockey arena).

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Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympics Winter Games Region / Région des jeux olympiques et paralympiques d’hiver de 2010 à Vancouver

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a special edition 1:250 000 scale topographic map was produced to support the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympics Winter Games. This large-format wall map provides broad, up-to-date coverage of the Winter Games region in British Columbia.

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Canada’s Land Cover / Couverture des terres du Canada

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a poster showing the different types of land cover across the Country. The map is primarily based on AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data, offering very precise detail. The land cover image contains 31 land cover classes. These have been grouped into 9 large land cover classes from coniferous forest to snow and ice. There are photos showing visually what each of these 9 land cover areas look like.

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Canada’s Population Density / Densité de la population du Canada

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a poster showing population density across Canada. There is a relief base to the map on top of which is shown all populated areas of Canada where the population density is great than 0.4 persons per square kilometer. This area is then divided into five colour classes of population density based on Statistics Canada’s census divisions.

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Terres humides

La série de cartes-affiches de l’Atlas du Canada contient une affiche qui décrit la nature des terres humides, en utilisant des photos et du texte pour décrire divers types de terres humides. Une autre série de photos et de textes décrit l’importance des terres humides et les pressions exercées sur les zones humides par les activités humaines. La carte centrale sur l’affiche, une carte du Canada à l’échelle d’environ 1: 20 000 000, montre la répartition des terres humides au Canada et les voies de migration des oiseaux migrateurs (car ces oiseaux dépendent fortement des terres humides pour migrer).

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The Boreal Forest

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a poster which shows the location of boreal forest in Canada. The two sided poster graphically depicts the importance of the boreal forest as a dynamic system of shrubs, trees, herbs, mosses, micro-organisms, insects and animals interacting among themselves and with rock, soil, water and air. The history and economy of the forest is overviewed from 8,000 years ago to today. The boreal forest is a huge, resilient and constantly changing ecosystem, driven by the long term succession of tree species and the animals which inhabit them. The poster map graphically depicts the challenges of sustainable forest management of this beautiful and expansive resource. The Boreal Forest Poster Map is jointly published by the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada of the Department of Natural Resources Canada and Canadian Geographic Enterprises, publisher of Canadian Geographic magazine.

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The Circumpolar North / Le nord circumpolaire

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a poster which has been adapted from The Atlas of Canada’s Northern Circumpolar Region map, MCR0001. It also contains a Modis satellite image showing the same northern area as the map (composite from July to September 2007) produced by the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Natural Resources Canada. This bilingual poster-map has detailed coverage of all parts of the world north of approximately 55 degrees. National capital cities are displayed along with other cities, towns, villages and hamlets; all have been updated to 2008. Some seasonally populated places are also shown. A number of significant northern features can be found such as the minimum permanent polar sea ice extent for 1972 to 2007, tree line, undersea relief and undersea feature names, land relief, historical surveyed locations of the Magnetic North Pole from 1831 to 2007 and updated glaciers, ice fields and coastal ice shelves.

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Wetlands

Contained within the Atlas of Canada Poster Map Series, is a poster which outlines the nature of wetlands, using photos and text to describe various types. A further set of photos and text describes the importance of wetlands, and the pressures on wetlands from human activities. The central map on the poster, a map of Canada at a scale of approximately 1: 20 000 000 shows the distribution of wetlands in Canada, and also the flyways of migratory birds (as these birds depend heavily on wetlands when migrating).

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History, 1639 to 1980

America Septentrionale

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada map series, is a reproduction of the original Amerique Septentrionale map by Nicolas Sanson and was published in 1695 by Pierre Mortier in Amsterdam.

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America Septentrionalis

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada map series, is a reproduction of the original 1639 America Septentrionalis map by the Dutch map making family, Hondius.

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An Accurate Map of Canada with the Adjacent Countries

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada is a reproduction of the An Accurate Map of Canada with the Adjacent Countries. It was produced by Richard William Seale and published in London by J. Hinton.

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Bird’s Eye View of the City of Ottawa

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada map series, is a reproduction of one of the bird’s eye view sketches of cities which were very popular in the late 19th century. In this case, it is a black-and-white sketch drawn by Herm. Brosius and originally published by Chicago Litho. Co. As of 1876, Ottawa consisted of only part of Centretown, Byward, and Sandy Hill. The view lists dozens of major buildings at the time. It also has a sketch of the three buildings of Parliament. Of interest, all streets and railway lines are named.

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Mounted Police Stations and Patrols

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada map series, is a reproduction of an 1888 map compiled by Surveys and Mapping Branch of Energy Mines and Resources [now Natural Resources Canada] to commemorate the 1973 centenary of the RCMP. The map shows stations and patrol routes in the North-West Territories during 1888. The area covered corresponds to present-day southeastern Alberta and southern Saskatchewan. The map has a great deal of information about Indian lands, showing treaty areas, Indian reserves, and giving populations on the reserves.

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Atlas of Canada 1st Edition, 1906

Aborigines of Canada, Alaska and Greenland – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the distribution of 11 aboriginal groups of Canada, Alaska and Greenland. The areas shown in different colours represent occupied land by the native linguistic families, including uninhabited large areas in the Arctic islands and Greenland. The southern portion of Canada, the Indians are living on reserves. The other points indicated are small reminants of the once powerful Huron-Iroquois at Jeune Lorette, two small bands of Iroquois near Edmonton and on the head waters of the Athabaska river. There are a greater number of linguistic families on the Pacific coast of British Columbia than in all the rest of Canada.

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Canals, Lighthouses and Sailing Routes St. Lawrence and Great Lakes – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows canals, as well as locations and types of Lighthouses along the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes. In addition, the map also shows sailing routes through those water bodies. There is a table of sailing distances, in geographical miles, between the ports of the United States and Canada on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence. Statistics of freight and passenger traffic through the canals, total cost of maintenance, and the construction of Canadian canals, are shown as of 1903-1904. There are also steamship routes from Canadian ports to other ports in Canada and in the U.S. The lighthouses are distinguished between fixed, revolving lights, and light ships. The depth of the water of the Great Lakes is indicated by contours and tints of blue. The deeper portions are shown in the darker tints, while lighter tints indicate more shallow waters.

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Density of Population British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps. The maps show the density of population per square mile for every township in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, Alberta, circa 1901. The statistics from the 1901 census are used, yet the population of Saskatchewan and Alberta is shown as confined within the vicinity of the railways, this is because the railways have been brought up to date of publication, 1906. Cities and towns of 5000 inhabitants or more are shown as black dots. The size of the circle is proportionate to the population. The map uses eight classes, seven of which are shades of brown, more densely populated portions are shown in the darker tints. Numbers make it clear which class is being shown in any one township. Major railway systems are shown. The map also displays the rectangular survey system which records the land that is available to the public.

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Density of Population Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps. The maps show the density of population per square mile for every township the Maritime Provinces, Quebec and Ontario, circa 1901. Cities and towns of 5000 inhabitants or more are shown as black dots. The size of the circle is proportionate to the population. The map uses eight classes, seven of which are shades of brown, more densely populated portions are shown in the darker tints. Numbers make it clear which class is being shown in any one township.

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Drainage Basins – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the delineation of drainage basins. The geographic extent of each drainage basin is delineated and the total area drained for each basin is provided in square miles. This includes the great oceanic drainage basin and the Hudson Bay basin. Only the Canadian drainage area is indicated on the map for basins that lie partly in the United States. There is also a table listing the lengths of major rivers of Canada and their principal tributaries.

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Forests – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the extent of forested regions, using tints of green, in Canada circa 1906. These regions include the Southern forest, Northern forest, and the Cordilleran forest. The map presents general portions of forested areas across the country which has been generally cleared of timber. Displayed is the section of Northern Forest that are less densely wooded; mixed prairie and woodland; Prairie; National Parks and Forest Reserves of the Dominion. There are also lists, by province, of the principal trees of Canada, in addition to notes of when distribution is confined to a comparatively small portion of the area of the province. The map also includes major cities, rivers, major bodies of water, and some railway systems.

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Geology East Sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the geology and bedrock for Eastern Canada. The rock type era and period of formation are represented as letter codes and colour, in addition to indicating the surface coverage. The map emphasizes the extensive area in the Dominion that is occupied by the Archaean nucleus. It also includes major cities and railway systems.

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Geology West Sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the geology and bedrock for Western Canada. The rock type era and period of formation are represented as letter codes and colour, in addition to indicating the surface coverage. The map emphasizes the extensive area in the Dominion that is occupied by the Archaean nucleus. It also includes major cities and railway systems.

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International and Interprovincial Boundaries British Columbia & Yukon-Alaska Boundary, Ontario-Manitoba Boundary – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that consists of 2 maps illustrating international and interprovincial boundary historical claims up to 1906. One map shows Ontario, Manitoba and adjacent parts of the US. The other map shows the Alaska boundary dispute. British Columbia and Yukon – Alaska boundary map displays the respective disputes of Great Britain and the United States, as well as the awarded boundary announced October 20th, 1905. The Ontario-Manitoba boundary map was concentrated on the contestation of the Dominion and Manitoba disputing the Ontario boundary on the west by prolongation of a due north line from the joining of the Ohio and Mississippi, as well as the height of land between the St. Lawrence and Hudson bay. In addition, major railway systems displayed.

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International and Interprovincial Boundaries Eastern Canada – United States Boundary, Islands in the Bay of Fundy, San Juan Water Boundary, Canada – Labrador Boundary, New Brunswick – Quebec Boundary – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows five maps illustrating international and interprovincial boundary claims. Two show the Quebec – New Brunswick – Maine area, and another displays the Canada – Labrador boundary. There are two small maps showing offshore claims; one for the Bay of Fundy, and the other for the Gulf Islands (San Juan) in the Strait of Georgia. The Eastern Canada- United States boundary was commonly called the ‘Marine boundary’ from 1783 to 1842. There were still many disputes going on at the time, including jurisdiction of Newfoundland, the province of New Brunswick – Quebec and the United States, as well as Vancouver Island. The boundary indicating the Labrador coast was to be claimed by Canada. In addition, major railway systems displayed.

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Isotherms for Months of Year – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows isothermal lines for each month of the year. Within the plate there are 12 maps, one for each month that varies from January to December. These lines are drawn at intervals of 5 degrees Fahrenheit connect the points having the same mean temperature. They are deduced from observations by the Meteorological Service extending over a series of years.

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Isotherms for Summer and Year, Rainfall, Snowfall and Isobars – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows 11 maps. Two maps at the top of this plate presenting isothermal lines for summer and for the entire year. The isotherms for summer display the great northern “loop” of the summer isotherm of 55 degrees Fahrenheit, which make cultivation of cereals possible. The annual isothermal lines follow an easterly and Westerly direction which would obscure the beneficial effect indicated by the summer isotherms. The next four maps show precipitation and snowfall for Eastern and Western Canada in inches. The remaining five maps show isobaric lines. One map shows the annual average, while the other four cover seasons (January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December). Barometric pressure is measured in inches of mercury. In some of the maps, major railway systems are shown.

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Lighthouses and Sailing Routes, Atlantic Coast – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the lighthouses and sailing routes on the Atlantic Coast. The map shows sailing routes and a table listing the distance, in miles, from Halifax, Montreal and Quebec to major ports. Although Newfoundland and Labrador was not a part of Canada in 1906, there is some data shown for this region. The lighthouses are distinguished between fixed, revolving lights, and light ships. The depth of water in the Great Lakes is indicated by contours and tints of blue. The deeper portions are shown in the darker tints, while lighter tints indicate more shallow waters.

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Lighthouses and Sailing Routes, Pacific Coast – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the lighthouses, as well as sailing routes along the Pacific Coast, circa 1906. There are routes that sailing distances are given from the principal ocean ports of Canada to the other great ocean ports of the world. A table gives the distance, in miles, to Vancouver and Victoria from other major ports. The lighthouses are distinguished between fixed and revolving lights, and light ships. The depth of the water along the coast line is indicated by contours and tints of blue. The deeper portions are shown in the darker tints, while lighter tints indicate shallow waters.

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Limits of forest trees – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the northern limits of approximately 40 different tree species in Canada, including an extension into the Northern U.S. Using green lines the map displays the northern limits of the principal trees found within the Southern Forest. Blue lines indicate the northern, and in a few incidences the southern, limits of the principal trees found within the Northern Forest. Red lines show the limits of the trees within the Cordilleran Forest. For this map, and the Atlas of Canada Forests map, the line of division between the Northern and Southern Forests has been taken as the northern limit of red and white pine. These trees are assigned to the Northern Forest, including those whose limit is south of the pine tree limits within the Southern Forest. The map also includes, rivers, major bodies of water, and a few tree types labeled in specific locations.

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Minerals, east sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the mineralogy and locations of mineral deposits for Eastern Canada circa 1906. A line drawn across the map indicates where the Northern, large portion of the Dominion is virtually unprosecuted except along the valleys of the principal rivers, including the Southern, partly prospected areas. Different symbols indicate which type of mineral is located in a specific location. The map includes major cities, rivers, major bodies of water, and some railway systems.

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Minerals, west sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the mineralogy and locations of mineral deposits for Western Canada circa 1906. A line drawn across the map indicates where the Northern, large portion of the Dominion is virtually unprosecuted except along the valleys of the principal rivers, including the Southern, partly prospected areas. Different symbols indicate which type of mineral is located in a specific location. The map includes major cities, rivers, major bodies of water, and some railway systems.

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Montreal, Toronto – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is plate that has two maps. The first map is of the city of Montreal and the second map is of the city of Toronto. At this time the cities had a population over 25, 000. The map indicates the location of city wards, electric railways, and churches shown with the symbol of a cross.

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Origins of the People, 1901 Manitoba and Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Alberta – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate map that shows 2 maps. The first map shows the origins of the people in British Columbia and Alberta, circa 1901. The second map shows the origins of the people in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A varying number of ethnic groups are shown, but always included are: English, Scotch [Scottish], Irish, French and German. People of British origin predominate in all provinces, except Quebec, where the French predominate. Germans, principally descendants of United Empire Loyalists, predominate in portions of Alberta, displaying a cosmopolitan population due to immigration from Great Britain and Europe. Communities with a population greater than 5000 people are shown as proportional dots on the map. In addition, major railway systems displayed. The map displays the rectangular survey system which records the land that is available to the public.

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Origins of the People, 1901 Maritime Provinces and Quebec, Ontario and Quebec – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps. The first map that shows origins of the people in Maritime provinces and Eastern Quebec, circa 1901. The second map that shows origins of the people in Quebec and Ontario, circa 1901.A varying number of ethnic groups are shown, but mainly: English, Scotch [Scottish], Irish, French and German. People of British origin predominate all provinces, except Quebec, where the French predominated. The French also predominate in adjacent portions of Quebec, such as portions of eastern Ontario, northern New Brunswick, southwestern Nova Scotia, and in the southern portion of Cape Breton. In two small areas near Halifax, N.S., the map indicates descendants of deported persons from Jamaica. The Germans were principally descendants of United Empire Loyalists predominating portions of southern Nova Scotia, Waterlook, Lincoln and Welland counties.

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Quebec, St. John, Winnipeg – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that has three maps. The first map is of the city of Quebec, the second map is of the city of St. John and the third map is of the city of Winnipeg. At this time these cities had a population over 25, 000. The map indicates the location of city wards, electric railways, and churches symbolized as crosses.

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Railways British Columbia and Yukon – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in for British Columbia and Yukon circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. An overprint note, in blue, gives some updated information. Any point in the area coloured green, is in a closer proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the Mackenzie & Mann System in yellow. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. Some mileage data is as of 1905. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

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Railways Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in Saskatchewan, areas of Manitoba and Alberta circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. An overprint note, in blue, gives some updated information. Any point in the area coloured green, is in a closer proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the other lines. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. Some mileage data is as of 1905. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

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Railways Ontario and Quebec – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in Ontario and western Quebec, circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. For example, any area coloured green, is in a closer proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the other lines. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. Some mileage data is as of 1905. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

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Railways Quebec and Maritime Provinces – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in the Maritimes and part of Quebec circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. For example, any point in the area coloured green, is in a closer proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the other lines. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

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Relief Map East Sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the relief (in feet) for Eastern Canada. Depth of the elevation is proportional to the varying tints of brown. The highest elevations are shown in the darkest tints and lower portions in lighter tints. Relatively large areas of Western Canada had incomplete data on relief as of 1906. The map also shows major drainage divides and railways.

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Relief Map West Sheet – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada, is a map that shows the relief (in feet) for Western Canada. Depth of the elevation is proportional to the varying tints of brown. The highest elevations are shown in the darkest tints, and lower portions in lighter tints. Relatively large areas of Western Canada had incomplete data on relief as of 1906. The map also shows major drainage divides and railways.

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Routes of Explorers – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the routes followed by the principal explorers from 1497 up to 1905. Each route is marked as a red line on the map, giving the name of the explorer or company, and when that person travelled along the route. The map also provides the dates of the founding principal forts and trading posts of the French, Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies.

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Sunshine and Temperature – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows 9 maps. Four maps show the average possible hours of sunshine for Canada in the summer months. There is a map for June, July, and August, in addition to a map combining these months. In the northern portion of Canada there is considerably more sunshine during the summer months, than in the southern portions, but mainly in eastern Canada. As a result, wheat will mature in less time within Ontario, then in Edmonton or Calgary. The other five maps show the number of days during the year with temperatures above 32 degrees F (0 degrees C), 40 degrees F (4.4 degrees C), 50 degrees F (10 degrees C), 60 degrees F (15.6 degrees C) and 70 degrees F (21.1 degrees C). The temperature differences are indicated with solid or dashed red lines indicating the number of days each portion of Canada will experience above temperatures indicated. In some of the maps, major railway systems are shown.

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Telegraphs British Columbia, Yukon and Alberta – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for British Columbia, Yukon and Alberta. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country may have two or three telegraph lines serving the principal towns along each route indicated. It shows the shore portions of various cable lines along the Pacific coast of Canada, and a couple running underwater. Most telegraph lines follow alongside railway lines. The Yukon is separate, being displayed at the top right of the map in a magnified boundary. The map includes provinces, major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water the railway systems. The map also displays part of the rectangular survey system which records the land that is available to the public. This grid like system is divided into sections, townships, range, and meridian from mid-Manitoba to Alberta.

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Telegraphs Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) Atlas of the Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country may have two or three telegraph lines serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines follow alongside railway lines. Major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water and the railway systems are also included. The map displays the rectangular survey system which records the land that is available to the public. This grid like system is divided into sections, townships, range, and meridian from mid-Manitoba to Alberta.

Sample Map
Telegraphs Ontario and Quebec – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for Ontario and western Quebec. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country like Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec may have two or three telegraph lines serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines follow alongside railway lines. The map indicates the shore portions of the various cable lines. It also includes major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water the railway systems.

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Telegraphs Quebec and Maritime Provinces – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the network and destinations of telegraph lines in Quebec and Maritime Provinces. More then one line may have followed the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map, especially in larger cities. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country are likely to have more then one telegraph line serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines are alongside railways. The map includes the routes and destinations of underwater cables. It also indicates the shore portions of the various cable lines, including the Marconi stations on the Atlantic coast of Canada, magnified and placed in the bottom left corner. The map also includes major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water and the railway system.

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Telephones Maritime Provinces and Quebec – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telephone network for the Maritime Provinces and Quebec circa 1906. Due to the scale of the map the inclusion of all the telephone lines in the vicinity of the larger cities and towns were not permitted. Thus, several lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. The map shows the shore line portions of various cable lines running along the Atlantic coast of Canada. Some telephone lines follow alongside railway networks, while their paths and end nodes are displayed as grey/purple thick lines. The map also includes major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water, the railway systems running past the border and into part of the U.S.

Sample Map
Telephones Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and Yukon – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows five maps. The maps show the telephone network for Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia and Yukon. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but due to the scale of the map the inclusion of all the telephone lines in the vicinity of the larger cities and towns were not permitted. The telephone lines and their end nodes are represented as solid grey lines, and many lines follow alongside railway tracks. The map indicates the shore line portions of the various cable lines, the Pacific ocean in British Columbia, and inland waters in Alberta, central Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Each segment is magnified into separate boundaries, and divided from one another. The maps includes major cities, counties, rivers, major bodies of water, and the railway systems running past the border and into part of the U.S.

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Territorial Divisions – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the territorial divisions of Canada. The map displays 1,922.735 sq. miles of unsettled North West Territories, covering what is now Northern Ontario. In addition to this is the northern half of Quebec, which includes the southern part of Labrador. Manitoba is considerably smaller with its width mainly in the south, but only going a third as far north to the middle of Lake Winnipeg. Using a variety of colours the map emphasizes large proportion of the Dominion in the North West Territories, and well as the other territorial divisions. The boundaries of the Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, is represented as they are found in the present day. Newfoundland is not yet a part of Canada, thus omitted as one of the Canadian provinces.

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Transcontinental Railways – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the Canada’s transcontinental rail network, including the ownership of these lines. The portions of the main lines of the Grand Trunk, Grand Trunk Pacific, Canadian Pacific and Mackenzie & Mann (Canadian Northern) railway companies are shown as being in operation, under construction and projected systems. This is represented as either red, green, or blue, solid or dashed lines. Major rail lines in the U.S controlled by Canadian operators are also shown.

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Vancouver, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Halifax – Atlas of Canada 1st Edition

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that show five maps displaying the cities of Vancouver, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, and Halifax. At this time these cities had a population over 25,000. The map indicates the location of city wards, electric railways, and churches symbolized as crosses.

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